Ways to Ease Summer Tension

MassageBook offers up a cool infographic of ways to ease tension.

  1. You probably don’t need a meditation app, but somehow, spend time with this. Prayer, meditation, or just silence, this will help.
  2. Everyone I know who has done this has been glad they did! The body wasn’t meant to be in the same position for hours on end. Whether your work is sitting or standing, it is super important that you find a way to move around. Your body will thank you!
  3. There is a wide variety in styles of massage, and different types help in different ways. Don’t get stuck in the chain massage rub-down rut and think that’s what massage is, because massage is SO much more than that.
  4. For most people, stretching is a great way to get moving and keep moving! Some of us can “stretch” and never really feel it. If you’re one of those sorts (I am!), don’t push the stretch, but that doesn’t mean don’t stretch at all.
  5. There are some really useful acupressure points. I know a lot of people think Ancient Chinese Medicine is nonsense, but these things actually work. It’s just a different way of approaching the same information.
  6. Smart phones are great, but they’ve given us several new ways to injure ourselves, and these gadgets are changing the way our minds work and process information. Use the gadgets, but use them wisely and sparingly.

Massage and Sleep

Getting good, restorative sleep is one of the best things a person can do for their health. But what happens if sleep is hard to come by? And what can you do about it?

Are you looking for new ways to move past your sleep troubles? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that a third of US adults get less than the recommended amount of sleep. Even worse, chronic lack of sleep can result in diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, or even heart disease.

The good news: getting a regular massage might just be the answer — and an enjoyable one at that. For example, one study conducted in China found that 76% of people treated regularly with massage therapy no longer experienced symptoms of insomnia.

From Tuck: Advancing Better Sleep
Read more…

Burn Scar Therapy

On Saturday, nearly a week ago, I went back to my massage school campus. There was a continuing education course that I was very interested in that happened to be taking place there.

There were five of us students, the teacher, and an AMTA representative sitting in. The topic of the day was massage for burn survivors. We discussed the physical trauma of burns, the continued trauma of treatment, and the ongoing psychological ramifications that survivors face. We learned the types and physiology of scars and how to work on them (or not, in some cases).

The teacher of the course is a massage therapist and a burn survivor, so throughout the class, she volunteered her own scars for us to learn on. At the end of the day, three others came in for us to practice on, and also to get a good idea of the variety of experiences in the burn survivor community.

The day was honestly incredible. There were intense moments throughout, but it was a positive, enriching experience, and well worth the cost of attendance.

Participation in that day would almost have been sufficient on its own, but I am now qualified to do burn scar therapy in my massage practice. I look forward to the opportunity to serve the burn survivor community!

25 Reasons

Relieve stress
Relieve postoperative pain
Reduce anxiety
Manage low-back pain
Help fibromyalgia pain

Reduce muscle tension
Enhance exercise performance
Relieve tension headaches
Sleep better
Ease symptoms of depression

Improve cardiovascular health
Reduce pain of osteoarthritis
Decrease stress in cancer patients
Improve balance in older adults
Decrease rheumatoid arthritis pain

Temper effects of dementia
Promote relaxation
Lower blood pressure
Decrease symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Help chronic neck pain

Lower joint replacement pain
Increase range of motion
Decrease migraine frequency
Improve quality of life in hospice care
Reduce chemotherapy-related nausea

Visit AMTA’s site for bibliographic information.